Proving And Proofing Yourself As A REAL Author

Who is the better, smartest, most valuable, and successful author? One writer works years to write a 400-page book best-selling series. Another writer works for months on scraps of time to push together an (eventually) best-selling series of short stories.

So, which of these two writers have proved themselves to earn the honorable title of AUTHOR? First of all, I’d like to take a chance at offending any and all egos of writers and authors everywhere. The most obvious thing that stands as a ginormous roadblock on the way to each of our successes: Stop the comparisons. It’s killing your dreams

I’m not sure how many times I’ve rolled over in my mind for the past year negative thoughts concerning forging forward as a writer. In case anyone else has gone through this, I’m going to state my negative thoughts and reveal the actuality.

KILLER COMPARISON #1 – I don’t have the resources other successful authors have to write and publish a book and be successful myself.

ACTUALITY #1 – Shut it. Do you mean to tell me Indie authors such as Jasinda Wilder, Beverly Kendall, Bella Andre, and Bella Street got handed a silver spoon then suddenly POOF! – Miraculous transformation into the life of proven authorship! No. Hell, no. They, like every other writer, was first and foremost doubtful. The difference is–They informed themselves, persisted, took chances and finished something.

Are you a mother or father of three in debt up to your eyeballs feeling trapped by the daily grind – but hey, you can write amazing short stories in the spare time you make for yourself like Jasinda Wilder? YOU HAVE THE RESOURCES. Pen, paper, a free blog to voice your work. There are Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, and Facebook for promotions (not a good idea to spam links, btw. But interacting and building relationships creates opportunity for those you connect with and yourself when those “big breakthroughs” happen. They will happen, so don’t give up!)

Hmm..where was I? Oh!

There are free apps for your freaking android phone to post to your blog on the fly, FREE publishing through Createspace on Amazon. COMPARISON DEBUNKED.

KILLER COMPARISON #2 – I don’t have the time other writers have to write. The quality of my work is suffering; for this reason, my writing is an unattractive hemorrhoid on the buttocks of the most revered authors of all time.

ACTUALITY #2 – Sit your (hopefully hemorrhoid-free) ass down for ten solitary minutes a day and write something. Hell, think about what you’ll write in the next 10-minute break and jot down your ideas when you hide from your family in the locked bathroom (not that I’d ever do that 😉 )

Three ten-minute breaks a day – no distractions, focus, quiet – is 30 minutes toward your goal. You’re furthering yourself, developing your style and voice, and most importantly producing something that is meaningful to you. Think small goals: complete them, celebrate them, then continue working toward the big picture for your future. Whatever you do, keep reminders around of your progress and continue on the path of most resistance.

The more you challenge yourself to stay flexible while pursuing your dreams, the less cumbersome you’ll feel during the journey. You’ll begin to value your system of progress as goals unfold before your eyes. It will be fuel to continue.

Now all you have to do is put that paragraph, poem, short story, instructional manual on How Many Licks It Takes to Get to The Center of a Tootsie-Pop–if that’s your thing–write it and put yourself out there.

KILLER COMPARISON #3 – It’s overwhelming. I don’t have the support or connections other writers have.

ACTUALITY #3 – I’m going to be gentler here. Time to out myself, once again.

notsureiftheycare

Do you realize how many days I’ve told myself, “no one cares about the story I want to tell.” Or, “I have nothing of intelligent value to contribute because I prefer simpler-stated and more direct jargon.” OR – this one was a real winner – “writers have suffered in silence for ages. I don’t need to let anyone in because it may hurt my creative groove.” (Um. Reluctant ego butthurt, much?)

Here’s the thing I’m learning about support and connections. Both are acquired over time and require a whole heck of a lot of persistent effort. I’ve had to seek support continuously. It’s an on-going thing, where you draw from several avenues and resources to finally find somewhere where you’re at home and feel comfortable. You have to nurture these connections and support avenues so they are beneficial.

Something I’ve had to keep in mind is to stay fluid and tolerant of my real life situations. Right now I’m usually MIA during prime social media hours because I have a young child, need to take care of my health, and nurture my marriage more. It’s (mostly) accepted in my household now (after a lot of verbal scuffles) that I need my writing time. I just DO. My family is happier because I’m happier, and so forth.

First and foremost, I write. The way life is going now I feel the wisest way to connect with others is to keep those connections behind the scenes. Writing groups and a few good friends who are gracious enough to share writing tips and resources as I stay involved when I’m able to, help.

Find what works for you, but try to keep writing something.

KILLER COMPARISON #4 – I don’t have the voice or influence other writers have to make things happen for myself.

ACTUALITY #4 – I vote we all synchronize our social media channels to simultaneously crash in the event we make an event out of our insecurities.

Everyone is scared. Not many openly admit it, but they are.

Something that has helped me is to voice my insecurities. It could be through a journal entry or a fiction story or blabbing into thin air – but I work them out. I’m learning it is vital to appreciate weaknesses as well as strengths without discouraging myself into a loop of never-ending discontentment.

You never know who may need to hear what you have to say until you say it. 

If you go around all hunky-dory happy smiley face, then suddenly quit – you can be sure it wasn’t a sudden decision to give up on yourself. You’ve nurtured that negativity by ignoring your problems. I’ve done this so many times I’ve lost count. Now I’m beginning to recognize this pattern and change it.

Remember to be open to others as they share their experiences with you. Most writers want to lift one another up. Don’t worry about the haters – let them hang themselves with their own rope.

WHEW. I had a lot to say on this. Thanks for staying with me and making it through this far. Something lit my fire, and I wanted to share with you the inspiration as I’m coming along with the writing. I hope you take something valuable from this post and can use it to help inspire yourself and others. I’m reminding myself to have fun along the way and think outside the box.

Now only one question remains: Who wants to tackle the daunting task of writing the instructional manual on how many licks it takes to get to the center of a Tootsie-Pop? 😉

I’m sure whomever it is will PROVE themselves to be REAL author if they’ll only just try. 🙂